Ancient Wonders soon to go OOP

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The Alchemy Press Book of Ancient Wonders, edited by Jan Edwards and Jenny Barber, is soon to be out of print. If you haven’t bagged yourself a copy now is the time to do so. In a year used copies may be worth £££ or $$$.

“When we think of a wonder, our minds go most often to the great buildings of the past – the pyramids, the Taj Mahal, Stonehenge – but the human mind can make almost anything wondrous. We walk with wonders every day, through the power of curiosity and imagination and our human tendency to make stories about what we fear, what we desire, what we wish to understand. This collection offers new glimpses into the wonder we all feel.” – Kari Sperring

Discover standing stones, burial mounds, ruined castles or sunken cities: the ancient sites that litter our landscapes; the ancient wonders that possess a mysterious appeal that cannot be denied.

Check out the great contents via this link. The book is available via Amazon and other online dealers.

Surveillance in Britain

This was originally posted in 2013 — and it’s time for a repeat airing:

Rod Rees writes: In researching my book Invent-10n it quickly became apparent that it wasn’t the surveillance side of State intervention in our lives – the employing of cameras and digital-communication intercepts to collect data about us – that we should be worried about but the use that is made of that data. And this, in turn, led me to the belief that there are now seven truisms regarding the surveillance-pervasive Britain of 2013.

Truism 1: We’re being watched.

Although statistics on the subject are difficult to pin down, the consensus seems to be that, by some margin, the British are the most watched people on the planet, with there being one CCTV camera for every fourteen of us (a conservative estimate, by the way). Now that’s an awful lot of surveillance and as none of these cameras are regulated, there is no information regarding the data they collect, for how long it’s held or who has access to it. The reality is that no matter where we are, we’re being watched.

What this also signals is how obsessive the British authorities (be they police, security services or local councils) are with CCTV surveillance: they have become the most avaricious voyeurs in history. The British authorities like to watch.

Continue reading

The world is changing

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The world is changing. Maybe this is so apt:

Greetings Gate, let’s Agitate. Look over your shoulder. Do you see the camera? Then dig that even as you read these words of sedition and denial you are being watched by the ever e-quisitive National Protection Agency. The National Protection Agency – omnipresent, omniscient and most ominous – which runs PanOptika, the spider at the centre of the Web.

PanOptika. What’s the slogan: watching out for the good guys by watching out for the bad guys. But what did that Roman word-slinger, Juvenal say? Quis custodiet ipsos custodes: who watches the watchers?

So dig this to the extremity, cats and kittens: if we do nothing soon we must kneel, digitally-dutiful, before National Protection, and then there will be no chance to zig when the ChumBots say zag, or to beep when they say bop. Realise thou that PanOptika triumphant means we will not be able to think, to act, to speak or to move without the spirit-sapping realisation that the badniks know everything … everything.

* We are circling the drain. This is my warning. *

A “freewheeling tour de force.” — James Lovegrove / Financial Times

Invent-10n by Rod Rees is available from Amazon and other online book dealers.

 

Private Life of Elder Things reviewed

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The Private Life of Elder Things by Adrian Tchaikovsky, Keris McDonald and Adam Gauntlett has received an excellent review on the Blasphemous Tomes website:

Although every story in The Private Life of Elder Things is a reinvention, none feels like a simple pastiche. It is all too easy to reuse elements of the work of Lovecraft and his peers in trite, obvious ways. Every story here makes its subject new and weird again, whether this is simply by moving it to an unusual setting or by transforming into something surprising.

What makes The Private Life of Elder Things stand out from most Mythos anthologies, however, is the emotional content and humanity of many of the stories. At its best, Lovecraftian fiction is unsettling, imaginative and weird, but it is rarely moving. The poignancy of stories like Season of Sacrifice and Resurrection and Devo Nodenti is all the more powerful for its presence in such an unexpected place.

You can read the full review here. The Private Life of Elder Things is available from Amazon and other online bookstores.

 

 

Best anthology of 2016

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The Dark Musings website has selected its best horror books of the year. We are honoured to be chosen as the best anthology with Something Remains:

My choice as the best anthology of 2016 however, goes to Something Remains, a book dedicated to the memory of Joel Lane who died three years ago. The stories within are inspired by, and based on, notes left by Joel and each individual author has done a remarkable job in creating them in such a way that you would believe Joel had written them himself. It’s a superbly produced book and I can think of no better way to honour his memory.

What better recommendation?

 

December 2016 Newsletter

 

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It’s almost the end of 2016, time for reflection. The Alchemy Press has had a relatively quiet year with just three titles under our belt: The Complete Epistles of Penelope Pettiweather, Ghost Hunter by Jessica Amanda Salmonson; The Private Life of Elder Things by Adrian Tchaikovsky, Keris McDonald and Adam Gauntlett; and Something Remains edited by Peter Coleborn and Pauline E Dungate, an anthology of stories based on the notes left by Joel Lane after his untimely death. Click on the titles to read more about these titles, or visit the Alchemy website to discover our complete range of books.

From a personal perspective, Peter has experienced the ups and downs of the NHS as he underwent a series of investigations for cancer, culminating in surgery soon after our return from FantasyCon, which was held in Scarborough this year (and which, by the way, we both thoroughly enjoyed despite the hiccups one usually encounters at such events). It’s too soon to know just how successful the surgery was – hopefully we’ll learn more by mid-January 2017.

Time to cheer up. Time for a bit of festive fun! Here’s something to occupy you over the Christmas holiday: unscramble the following anagrams, all are of writers who have graced the pages of Alchemy Press titles:

AN ADVISORY HAT KICK

AN UP LEAK

CLASH ON LINEN

LACE IN ROAD

MAD SEA JAILS MASONS CANON

REAP KITTENS

After you’ve rearranged these send your answers to us using this form before midnight 31st December 2016. The first three will have the choice from any of our limited editions: Nick Nightmare Investigates by Adrian Cole; Rumours of the Marvellous by Peter Atkins; Where the Bodies are Buried by Kim Newman; Merry-Go-Round by Bryn Fortey; or Invent-10n by Rod Rees (state your choice along with your answers). Please note that overseas prizes will be sent surface mail.

Finally, we wish you all a very happy Christmas, Yule, or whatever you choose to celebrate. Have fun. Let’s hope 2017 is a good year for all. And keep buying and reading books. Lots of books.

Hugs and love

Peter Coleborn and Jan Edwards