Horrors 3 update

We’ve now selected the stories for The Alchemy Press Book of Horrors 3.

We have contacted everybody who sent us a submission, as far as we know. If you haven’t heard from us we grovel apologies; please drop us an email.

I’ll post the table of contents shortly.

 

Submissions closed

The submissions’ window for The Alchemy Press Book of Horrors 3 is now closed. We extended it long enough to capture all those living on Pacific islands who might wish to submit something. Actually, no one from such an island sent us a story but we did receive manuscripts from the USA before noon on 1st February, so they made it okay. Everyone who submitted a story should have received an acknowledgment – let us know if you’ve not heard from us. 

We have received over 350 submissions! That’s many more than we anticipated. The proposed anthology will have around a dozen stories, maybe a few more. That means there will be a lot of disappointed writers. Judging by the submissions, the quality of stories in Horrors 3 will be high. Which is of course a good thing.

We have already started reading submissions and are shortlisting those for a further re-read. We aim to start letting people know of our decisions in four-six weeks. Please be patient.

 

Announcing a New Alchemy Press Anthology

H3 cover A001b

THE ALCHEMY PRESS BOOK OF HORRORS 3: A MISCELLANY OF MONSTERS

 

Monsters are many things. They come in all forms, shapes and sizes: from to the tiny to the titanic; from amorphous blobs to many limbed (or tentacled) monstrosities; from supernatural demons to man-made terrors. They come from any place and time: from under the bed to the woodshed; from the icy wastes to the darkest jungles; from the depths of the ocean to outer space; from the past, the future, the now!

Many things. Any things.

We are looking for stories featuring monsters for The Alchemy Press Book of Horrors 3: A Miscellany of Monsters to be edited by Peter Coleborn and Jan Edwards. To get a flavour of the type of writing we prefer, we suggest you check out volumes 1 and 2 of the series, available in print and eBook formats from Amazon and other sellers.

Check the above link for further details.

 

Roll Call

The thirty-nine steps books

 

Horrors 2 reviewed

THE ALCHEMY PRESS BOOK OF HORRORS 2: STRANGE STORIES & WEIRD TALES Edited by Peter Coleborn and Jan Edwards

The short fiction market continues to be a tough sell. Few of the magazines that took submissions in the golden ages of genre fiction now exist and those that do are inundated by new authors who believe that writing a short story is easy and quicker than penning a novel. In fact, the short story is no easier to write than a novel or poem and writing a good one demands talent as well as perseverance.

Fortunately, the market for genre short fiction still thrives in the professional publishing arena with publishers such as Jo Fletcher Books, Titan and PS Publishing holding the torch aloft, but it is often in the independent/small press field through which the very life blood of the horror and fantasy genres flows. The writers who appear in small press collections may not have the PR power of Stephen King but their fiction is no less honed and polished for eager readers.

The Alchemy Press Book of Horrors 2 continues this tradition…

Read the full review here.

Horrors 2 ready to pre-order

Now available to pre-order from Amazon and other book dealers. The book will be launched at this year’s Stokercon horror convention, held in Scarborough, UK, in April.

The Alchemy Press Book of Horrors volume 2

Strange Stories & Weird Tales

Edited by Peter Coleborn & Jan Edwards

Strange stories and weird tales and all of the creeping horrors in between. Horrors 2 features seventeen fabulous writers, including Sarah Ash, Paul Finch, John Grant, Nancy Kilpatrick, Garry Kilworth, Samantha Lee … to lead you on a spine-tingling tour from seaside towns to grimy cities, to the lonely and secret places, from the fourteenth precinct to Namibia … and so many places in between.

 

Best Horror of the Year

Every year sees a new volume in the Ellen Datlow-edited Best Horror of the Year series. The 2019 edition (volume 11), with a terrific cover by Audrey Benjaminsen, features work first published in 2018.

There are over 20 stories in this volume including “Masks” by Peter Sutton, from the pages of The Alchemy Press Book of Horrors. In her introduction, this is what Ellen says of Horrors:

In addition, Ellen lists the full recommended reading list on her blog (it’s in four parts). It includes nine stories from Horrors!

 

Horrors 1 reviewed on Goodreads

This review seemed to have passed us by — it appeared earlier this year on Goodreads. Pamela Scott says: “This collection (The Alchemy Press Book of Horrors) contains some of the best horror fiction I’ve read in ages … It’s great to read an anthology where you love every story in it. There tends to be a mixture of brilliant stores, good stories, okay ones and a couple that aren’t so good. I loved every story in this collection. The stories all fit into the ‘horror’ category, more or less. I loved how diverse and different the stories are. There are no two alike. I especially enjoyed Down Along The Backroads by Jenny Barber, Guising by Gary McMahon, Masks by Peter Sutton and The Trade-Up by James Brogden.”

 

Horrors 1 reviewed by the BFS

The Alchemy Press Book of Horrors gets a lovely review on the British Fantasy Society’s website. The reviewer, H T Scott, says:

The thing about anthologies is that you get a plethora of diversity, which in my humble opinion is no bad thing. The Alchemy Press book of horrors doesn’t disappoint, with contributions from well-known names such as Ramsey Campbell, Samantha Lee, Mike Chinn, and Peter Sutton, there are also a few authors there that I have never read before. Anthologies are a good way to dip your toes in the shallows of someone’s writing, giving the reader, us, an idea of what to expect.should we want to read more of their work One thing is for sure, Peter Coleborn and Jan Edwards have brought together some very talented people and every story in the book 100% deserves to be included.  Unthemed this collection takes the reader to some very dark places.

The full review can be found on the BFS website.

For more information on this book, click here.