What’s in Horrors?

There was an avalanche of stories submitted to The Alchemy Press Book of Horrors – especially in the final month of the submission’s window. To be honest, we didn’t expect to receive around 310 manuscripts seeking a home in this anthology. We were worried that we’d have too few submissions.

We read the stories as soon as possible after receiving them (but as indicated, January was a particularly busy month), maintaining a database of comments in order to narrow down to a shortlist.

Yet we managed it quickly – and then the shortlist itself needed to be pruned, and even so we couldn’t cut back to the original idea: an anthology containing a dozen stories. So we succumbed and settled on 25 stories. Without further ado, in alphabetical order (alphabetically by first name that is!), here’s what you’ll be reading in the latter part of 2018.

  • Adrian Cole: Broken Billy
  • Cate Gardner: The Fullness of Her Belly
  • Debbie Bennett: The Fairest of them all
  • Gail-Nina Anderson: An Eye for a Plastic Eye
  • Gary McMahon: Guising
  • James Brogden: The Trade-Up
  • Jenny Barber: Down Along the Backroads
  • John Grant: Too Late
  • Keris McDonald: Remember, Remember
  • Madhvi Ramani: Teufelsberg
  • Marie O’Regan: Pretty Things
  • Marion Pitman: The Apple Tree
  • Mike Chinn: Her Favourite Place
  • Peter Sutton: Masks
  • Phil Sloman: The Girl with Three Eyes
  • Ralph Robert Moore: Peelers
  • Ramsey Campbell: Some Kind of a Laugh
  • Ray Cluley: Bluey
  • Samantha Lee: The Worm
  • Stan Nicholls: Deadline
  • Stephen Laws: Get Worse Soon
  • Storm Constantine: La Tenebreuse
  • Suzanne Barbieri: In the Rough
  • Tina Rath: Little People
  • Tony Richards: The Garbage Men

In addition, the book will be garnished with a range of Jim Pitt illustrations. We aim to make this book one you’ll treasure.

 

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Sub window closes

No, not that type of sub.

The submission window for The Alchemy Press Book of Horrors is now closed. We have received 297 submissions to wade through (sorry, to read), make shortlists, and then finalised the table of contents. We hope to start contacting folk in a few weeks. Please be patient.

 

 

Horrors — Notes

Further information regarding the submission details for The Alchemy Press Book of Horrors:

  • We accept stories from anywhere in the world (the galaxy, even) if written in English
  • We only accept email submissions
  • We are looking for new stories although reprints may be considered
  • Please present your manuscript as a Word document (or RTF or similar) using standard formatting (double spacing, etc).
  • And you must include your name and contact email on the manuscript itself.

 

New Anthology Announced

2018 sees the re-launch of the Alchemy Press Book Of… anthologies with a brand new title: HORRORS, edited by Peter Coleborn and Jan Edwards. We are looking for horror stories … but tales that can be described as “weird”, “strange”, “amazing” and “peculiar”: stories that would have found a home in Weird Tales, Unknown Worlds, Fantastic and Fantasy Tales among other illustrious publications.

For the full guidelines visit the Alchemy Press of Horrors submissions page.

The world is changing

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The world is changing. Maybe this is so apt:

Greetings Gate, let’s Agitate. Look over your shoulder. Do you see the camera? Then dig that even as you read these words of sedition and denial you are being watched by the ever e-quisitive National Protection Agency. The National Protection Agency – omnipresent, omniscient and most ominous – which runs PanOptika, the spider at the centre of the Web.

PanOptika. What’s the slogan: watching out for the good guys by watching out for the bad guys. But what did that Roman word-slinger, Juvenal say? Quis custodiet ipsos custodes: who watches the watchers?

So dig this to the extremity, cats and kittens: if we do nothing soon we must kneel, digitally-dutiful, before National Protection, and then there will be no chance to zig when the ChumBots say zag, or to beep when they say bop. Realise thou that PanOptika triumphant means we will not be able to think, to act, to speak or to move without the spirit-sapping realisation that the badniks know everything … everything.

* We are circling the drain. This is my warning. *

A “freewheeling tour de force.” — James Lovegrove / Financial Times

Invent-10n by Rod Rees is available from Amazon and other online book dealers.

 

Something Remains reviewed

As mentioned previously, Des Lewis is writing real-time reviews of Something Remains, He began these reviews here and now continues them here. You need to scroll to the comments section of both blog to read Des’ comments on each story.

 

Something Remains blogged

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Allen Ashley, one of the esteemed contributors to Something Remains has written of his story “Natural History” in the book.

Joel gave us some of the finest short fiction you could ever hope to read. And now he has given me this story “Natural History” which would never have existed without his notes, his inspiration. The same is true for the other pieces collected in “Something Remains”: meticulously, even tenderly, written by those who loved and admired him.

Read the full essay on Allen’s website, here.

Something Remains is available as a paperback or eBook for the Kindle via Amazon and, probably, other online dealers.

The book is officially launched at FantasyCon later this month.