Elder Things reviewed

The Private Life of Elder Things — by Adrian Tchaikovsky, Keris McDonald and Adam Gauntlett gets a great review on SF Crowsnest:

Although the stories in this volume are inspired by Lovecraft’s work, it isn’t necessary to be familiar with his work but, in the case of Tchaikovsky’s tales, it helps to know where he is coming from. Those unfamiliar with Lovecraft may be inspired to seek out the originals. The volume, though, is a selection of stories worth perusing, regardless of your reading history.

Read the full review here.

Discover more about the book here.

 

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Evocations reviewed

Evocations by James Brogden has been reviewed on the SF Crowsnest website:

These and the other stories in this book give a taste of what Brogden can achieve. He is at his best when the story has a horrific element but for those wondering what else he can do, the last piece here is an extract from his novel Tourmaline.

You can read the fall review here or visit the book’s page here.

 

 

Tell No Lies reviewed

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John Grant’s Tell No Lies was reviewed in a recent post on the SF Crowsnest website (reviewed by Pauline Morgan).

Storytellers are good at lies. It is their stock in trade. A good storyteller is able to be convincing while being a master of misdirection. The reader is sucked in to the power of the tale before realising that everything is not how they expected it to be. In some cases this leads to a ‘groan effect’ as a twist is revealed that, although unexpected, is provided without the clues that on looking back were present. A subtle bard leaves the reader with a feeling of satisfaction. John Grant belongs to the latter school.

Read the full review here. Tell No Lies is available from Amazon and others, both in print and Kindle DRM free) formats.

 

Merry-Go-Round reviewed

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Bryn Fortey‘s Alchemy Press collection, Merry-Go-Round and Other Words, receives an in-depth review by Pauline Morgan on the SF Crowsnest website.

[T]hese stories have variety but the best of them show how a range of ideas can be meshed together to form small gems. Not everyone will like all the stories but it is worth savouring the best and trying to figure out how Fortey manages to juxtapose the impossible and make it work.

Merry-Go-Round is available in paperback (from Amazon and all the usual suspects) as as a limited edition hardcover, available via The Alchemy Press.